Creation and Curation

How many times have you thought, I wish I would have been a part of the Old Spice creation?” Or a part of creating any campaign gone viral? Perhaps you just wish you were creating daily content that was popular, meaningful and significant in and whatever you do.

Have you ever stopped to consider that maybe dabbling into more curation would be just as satisfying and effective?

The social space and world in general are full of people who want to create. Creating – the creative process – and fresh, new ideas make the marketing and business world go ’round. But what happens when this awesomely created content gets buried?  If no one is there to collect it all into one place, it is likely to quickly go missing. That is, unless we acknowledge the power of curation.

Curation is not something for “those who can’t create.” It should not be thought of as a B-level social task. Remember, part of our jobs as chief sharers is to save people time. Curating does this.

Here are 6 simple ways to rock curation:

  1. Take your niche or expertise and curate a list of various YouTube videos around it. For example, looking for ways to “take a yoga class with free YouTube videos?” The post has curated several, all in one place, depending on which level/type of yoga you want to do. Maybe your business sells yarn, so why not curate a list of “how tos” or demonstrations on various things to make with yarn; for beginners up to a more advanced level?
  2. Playlist. Curate a list of YouTube videos in a specific genre to share with your audience. Find the YouTube video desired, click “add to” and then add your “new playlist” name. Once you’ve added everything you’d like, you can grab the link to share the entire playlist.
  3. Pinterest. Yes, my new Master for visual curation. Create boards surrounding any topic or theme you want. Search for images to add to them. Didn’t find the right images on Pinterest, but somewhere else online? Download the “pin it” button to enable you to “pin” to your board(s) from any site. A few examples: a curated board for the gluten free, a curated board to remind us that attitude is everything and a curated board towards the healthy lifestyle.
  4. Twitter Lists. Yes, the Twitter lists you curate with various people placed on specific lists are a form of awesome curation. Whenever I’m looking to network with new gluten-free or healthy lifestyle people, I will typically seek out various lists. I always find people, and I am so thankful for these lists. I have my own gluten-free Twitter list to help others. If you are a brand, considering using this form of curation to identify other niche tweeps, brand ambassador tweeps, geo-specific tweeps and so on.
  5. Blog Posts. Write a list of resources on any given subject and post them in one place, on one post. Here are two examples I did that many people told me they appreciated: On Bookmarking: Social ROI and Analytics and 51 Things to Blog About. Did they take me a while to research and write? Yes! But did it benefit someone else? Absolutely!
  6. Crowdsource and Curate. Need help with a new marketing angle? How about a slogan? What about a local event idea? Ask in a creative, clever way all your social networks. Crowdsource several ideas. Then, spot the trends and find the patterns. Now curate different pieces of those trends and patterns, in combination with any stand-out crowdsourced ideas. You might be surprised with what you come up with!

Curation and creation are both important. It’s easy to think that only a handful of people can be great creators; I’d argue the same is true for curators. And in the past, you may have thought the only way to build “buzz” was to be the creator. Now, you have the power to build your own “buzz” by putting the human touch on all current content floating around.

If the goal is to provide value to your personal networks or business-related networks, then whether you create or curate is not the question. The real question is how and what will you create or curate to achieve those starting goals?

Source: labnol.org via Jessica on Pinterest

 

p.s. Not that I need anymore networks, but I did request for a private beta invite to scoop.it.

 

Which do you prefer? Creation or curation? Where have you seen some rockin’ curation?

Comments

  1. says

    I’ve seen curation all over the place and kept wondering what it was…”theming” is what I’ve always called it, so thanks for clearing that up.

    This article gave me lots of ideas on the different things I do and since I’ve always created, now I get how other creators can blend with me. A new step toward colloboration, too!

  2. says

    For the last two years, I’ve been collecting education links; websites, apps, curriculum in a Diigo list. At this point, with something like 2500 links, I find a high number of questions on Twitter or Plurk where I can find a website that meets the need. Questions like, “where can I find a good 3d grade math website that works with interactive white boards?” or “what are some special ed applications for elementary school children?”

    Here’s the list: http://groups.diigo.com/group/sites_for_education

    Curation rocks.

    Of course, not sure I could ever earn a living doing this, but it’s nice to be able to help people with questions.

    And the hero of education curation is Jerry Blumengarten, known as Cybraryman: http://www.cybraryman.com/index.html

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